Colonoscopies

What is a Colonoscopy?

A colonoscopy is a procedure that examines the large intestine and colon. A colonoscopy tests to see if there are any abnormalities or presence of pathogens. During a colonoscopy, Dr Viljoendoctor may take a sample of tissue that will be used for a biopsy as well as remove abnormal tissue..

Why is a Colonoscopy necessary?

Although a colonoscopy is more commonly known for testing for cancer, it also helps to find the underlying causes of other uncomfortable and worrying symptoms. Some of these symptoms include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Anaemia due to low iron
  • Blood in stool
  • Chronic constipation
  • Diarrhoea
  • Weight loss

Patients who have a family history of colon cancer or conditions related to colon cancer are at an increased risk of being diagnosed. In this case, a periodic colonoscopy often gets recommended to those patients.

What to expect from the procedure

Patients who have a family history of colon cancer or conditions related to colon cancer are at an increased risk of being diagnosed. In this case, a periodic colonoscopy often gets recommended to those patients.

Before your colonoscopy, for a period of 24 to 72 hours, you will need to follow a clear liquid diet. The clear liquid diet serves as bowel preparation for the colonoscopy.

It is also essential to notify Dr Viljoen of any medication that you're taking so that. If there is anything in the medicine that could affect the colonoscopy, he will be able to tell you whether or not you need to stop taking it before the procedure.

When you go for your colonoscopy, we’ll prescribe a sedative to help ease any pain or discomfort that you may experience. The colonoscopy allows the doctor to see if there are any abnormalities or growths.

If during the process, if abnormal tissue - such as polyps - are found, we will remove it during the procedure. It's also possible that we may take a tissue sample to do a biopsy. You'll get the results from this within a few days.

Post-procedure

Due to the effects of the sedative given, you're advised to bring someone along to your appointment so they can drive you home after the procedure. Your diet might be restricted for a few days after the surgery if there were any polyps or any other abnormal tissues removed. A little blood in your stool after the surgery is normal. However, if it continues or you experience abdominal pain or a fever over 37℃, contact us immediately.